Chapter 24 – His Worshipful The Mayor and Mayoress of Hackney 1951/2

by Jason Lever


Posted on Fri, 13 Dec 2013 16:41:10 GMT


Solomon and Annie Lever

(This chapter is based on his correspondence file accessed in Hackney Archives.)

Solomon Lever was elected by his fellow councillors Mayor of the Metropolitan Borough of Hackney for a term of one year in 1951/2. This traditional, largely ceremonial role in municipal government is usually filled by a councillor who has undertaken more onerous duties by serving on key committees of the council.

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(Left to right: Mayoress of Hackney (Annie), Lord Mayor of London, Lady Mayoress of London and Mayor of Hackney (Solomon))

One letter of congratulations was received from A.G. Tomkins OBE, the general secretary of the National Union of Furniture Trade Operatives. Solomon Lever’s reply, dated 12 June 1951, said that ‘...I think I will cherish this one more than any [congratulations], because it is from the General Secretary of my Trade Union, a Trade Union on which all my activities in public matters began and where I have received my apprenticeship’.

From the active citizenry of the borough, Mayor Lever was sought at an events of the Dalston and District Aquaria Society. While members of this group presumably studied and collected tropical fish, on the consumption front, he was also invited and gave a speech at the North West London Herring Week at the LEB Showrooms.

As President of the Disabled Soldiers and Sailors (Hackney) Foundation, he was sent their annual report; similarly, the annual report of the Toynbee [Hall] International Motorcyclists Association was posted to to Solomon Lever, its Vice-President.

Rather grand appeared his invitation to an art exhibition at ‘Windsor Castle’. The clue was in the speech marks, for this was Windsor Castle on the Lower Clapton Road, Hackney, E5, not the residency of King George and family.

The north of England successfully beckoned the Mayor of Hackney to Leeds, for a Special Chanukah Neshef and Dinner held by the Leeds Poale Zion Workers Circle (Div 5). It helped to have some connections, as Mayor Lever had long-standing involvement in Poale Zion and The Workers Circle.

Similarly, he was minded to attend the annual dinner and ball of the Jews’ Free School (JFS) Association at the Savoy Hotel in February 1952 – that he was recently found to have been an alumnus was highlighted in the invitation.


Hackney Trades-Unions JFS Toynbee-Hall Poale-Zion Workers-Circle

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Chapters

Chapter 1 - Introducing Solomon Lever and his l...Chapter 2 - The Jewish East EndChapter 3 - A family history of Solomon LeverChapter 4 - A Jewish East End education for Sol...Chapter 5 - Joining East End cultural and commu...Chapter 6 - Solomon as a cabinet makerChapter 7 – From cabinet maker to trade union g...Chapter 8 – Rise of the London Jewish Bakers UnionChapter 9 – Dealing with the challenges of a de...Chapter 10 – Solomon’s journey to Jewish trade ...Chapter 11 – Interlude of anarchism’s appeal to...Chapter 12 – Solomon Lever finds his home in th...Chapter 13 – The Liberal and Conservative partiesChapter 14 – The Labour Party consolidates its ...Chapter 15 – The appeal of East End councils’ s...Chapter 16 – The rise and fall of communist sup...Chapter 17 – Surging Labourism after the warChapter 18 – The Labour Party’s support for Zio...Chapter 19 – Short-lived Labour-Zionist honeymoonChapter 20 – Solomon Lever’s 1947 broadcast spe...Chapter 21 – Solomon Lever’s 1948 speech from t...Chapter 22 – Solomon Lever’s 1954 speech from t...Chapter 23 – Solomon Lever’s final TUC speech i...Chapter 24 – His Worshipful The Mayor and Mayor...Chapter 25 – Family connections in the Mayor’s ...Chapter 26 – Important social issues raised wit...Chapter 27 – The adbuction of Solomon LeverChapter 28 – Discovery of Solomon’s bodyChapter 29 – InquestChapter 30 – The death of Solomon LeverChapter 31 – Solomon’s funeral and obituaryChapter 32 – The death knell of the London Jewi...Chapter 33 – An appraisalChapter 34 – Bibliography